A deeper appreciation of the little moments.

Abstract Albums

What is abstract photography?

When I started photographing, I joined a critique group to refine my compositions and techniques. After a couple of these sessions, the leader commented, “you have an eye for textures and patterns.” However, I was in a critique group for travel photography. Our mission involved capturing images of people in places to encourage the viewer to take a mental vacation and hopefully inspire the plan for travel in the future. At that moment, although I understood the comment, I was disappointed.

We get nudges from many directions helping to point us on our path. I tucked that comment away, and when it kept surfacing, I leaned into what it was saying to me. My style of photographing does lean towards isolating a texture or pattern. I experiment endlessly to convey emotion. I’m less interested in the subject than the feeling of that moment.

So here I am, an abstract photography artist. I present to you these photography albums to encourage you to explore, interpret, and add your meaning to these images. I love the abstract world because we can transcend time. We can change reality. Our state of mind can explore within ourselves. Abstract art represents an expression of truths not bound by time or place. Your attention is the essential element.

“Art is incomplete without the perceptual or emotional involvement of the viewer.”

-Alois Riegl

Artistic Effects Albums

What is artistic photography?

More than just capturing an image, artistry comes into play when there is an emotion I am trying to convey. I use my camera settings to effect motion; I move the camera while taking the picture; or I modify the photo after I’ve taken it with software techniques. Art implies creativity, and although the camera was invented to document reality, as with any tool, as humans, we inevitably ask ourselves, “what if?” The result is, hopefully, aesthetic art pictures.

 

“Why should not the camera artist break away from the worn-out conventions and claim the freedom of expression which any art must have to be alive?”

-Alvin Langdon Coburn, 1882-1966

Artistic Effects: Abstract Autumn

“Take a new look at fall, one that dances, swirls, turns, and rushes on by. These abstract fall colors will open you to new sensations of the season of maturity and preparation.”

–Ann Newman

Artistic Effects: Alternative Grand Canyon

“The importance of creativity is that the more you flex your creative muscle, the better you get at innovating and solving problems. Experimenting with techniques for digital nature art, I created a new look for the Grand Canyon. Let your imagination wander is to explore her depths and moods.”

–Ann Newman

Artistic Effects: Tunnel Colors

“Upbeat colors and a dreamy effect of shapes from an unlikely place: underneath a highway. This tunnel’s walls were painted with geometric patterns. I twisted my camera around and around. I fell in love with the gradient colors, the lines and swirls, all giving off a fun, youthful vibe. Enjoy the variety of geometric abstract art that the tunnel and I produced in collaboration.”

–Ann Newman

Up Close Albums

Up Close Photography

I have a bad habit when it comes to taking photos: I want to get closer to my subject. Really close. Zoomed in. Sometimes I miss the bigger picture, pun intended. However, the appeal to me is to discover details that usually go unnoticed. Because the context is new to our eyes, these photos generally make for appealing abstract fine art.

 

“Viewed close up, nobody is normal.”

-Caetano Veloso

Up Close: Let’s Stay Home

“After a few shell-shocked mornings at the start of the Covid-19 lockdown, I looked up from having checked my phone for news updates. My attention was caught by the subtle movement across the wall. Slowly, methodically, a shadow invited me to focus on the present moment and appreciate what was unfolding in front of me. What resulted was making art in isolation.”

–Ann Newman

Silhouette head and camera with Grand Canyon photo inside
To learn more about how the “Stay at Home Command” photo evolved, see the journal entry by clicking here.

Intimate Landscapes Albums

What is artistic photography?

More than just capturing an image, artistry comes into play when there is an emotion I am trying to convey. I use my camera settings to effect motion; I move the camera while taking the picture; or I modify the photo after I’ve taken it with software techniques. Art implies creativity, and although the camera was invented to document reality, as with any tool, as humans, we inevitably ask ourselves, “what if?” The result is, hopefully, aesthetic art pictures.

 

“Why should not the camera artist break away from the worn-out conventions and claim the freedom of expression which any art must have to be alive?”

-Alvin Langdon Coburn, 1882-1966

Intimate Landscapes: Fall in Crested Butte

“Fall is the soft shoulder of seasons, releasing us from the heat of summer, gently guiding us towards the inevitable, relentless cold of winter. Come enjoy these aesthetic photos and a virtual trip with me.”

–Ann Newman

Intimate Landscapes: Winter in the Tetons

“Winter in the Grand Tetons is not just cold; it is one of the most pristine, quiet, and spiritual times to enjoy the rugged landscape. The crowds of summer are a mere memory. The mountains stand taller; the lakes are frozen over, storms move in suddenly, and vacate just the same. The setting inspires intimate landscape photography.”

–Ann Newman

Artistic Black and White Photos

“Dilapitated objects have a sense of mystery. They hold secrets from a long life. I wonder who road in the railcar, where were they going? What did they haul with that pickup truck? While time and transportation methods have moved forward, within the rust and paint swirls, I discover the texture of a living surface that is still developing. Who is to say when something is at the end of its useful life?”

–Ann Newman

Rust Art

“Dilapitated objects have a sense of mystery. They hold secrets from a long life. I wonder who road in the railcar, where were they going? What did they haul with that pickup truck? While time and transportation methods have moved forward, within the rust and paint swirls, I discover the texture of a living surface that is still developing. Who is to say when something is at the end of its useful life?”

–Ann Newman

Decay

Beautiful Decay Art

In rust, corrosion, and decay, we see impermanence. Could the effect of time and the elements on metal, paint, and glass be mirrors for ourselves?  As a society, we value youth. We shun aging. Yet, when you really think this through, isn’t it amazing that we’ve been granted another day to explore? We got to be young, and here we are, still able to learn and experience. Our bodies and minds are sacred and deserve our kindness and attention. Let’s embrace our aging, whether it is an old car, bad knees, or forgetting details. In all of it, your attention is what determines if something is beautiful.

 

“The world is afflicted by death and decay. But the wise do not grieve, having realized the nature of the world.” 

-The Buddha

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