Alternative Grand Canyon

Beautiful digital landscape art.

Grand Canyon photography is abundant, just as massive as the canyon herself.  How do you show the character of such a place differently in a uniquely abstract way? Well, I started experimenting with the idea of “changing landscapes.” And by that, I mean I changed the landscape. A lot!

Using digital artistic methods, I created a new look for the Grand Canyon. Use your imagination to explore her unknown depths.

Each of these digital art pieces came from one of my photos. I decided to use each photo twice to show different ways the mood tells a story. The canyon is this way, too. As the light changes each day, as the seasons migrate, and as you move from one viewpoint to the next, you experience another side of her spirit.

Temple Mysteries.

Egyptian Isis Temple mysteries revealed at Yavapai Point, Grand Canyon.

Beautiful landscape digital art shows the sunrise at Isis Temple with magical neon energy pulsing from the sky and traversing up and down the rugged canyon walls.

From Yavapai Point overlook in the Grand Canyon, the rising sun lit the Isis Temple’s tip for a few seconds before moving through the canyon. The chasm below drops deep into the darkness.

In mythology, the Goddess Isis married Osiris, who was lord of the underworld. Isis is best known as the magical healer. As I explore this image, I see the symbolism of the depths representing the underworld and the rising temple with brightness bringing healing energy forward.

 

 

Digital art photo of Isis Temple in Grand Canyon with fantasy neon lines on landscape and clouds.

Land Lightning.

Abstract surrealism art.

Lightning bolt artwork is also abundant. But what if an alternate canyon existed where the land was so charged, the earth emanated lightning strikes? Hiking the Grand Canyon would take on a new risk, and I wouldn’t want a steel-shank in my boots.

Again, this is Isis Temple at sunrise, just a whole lot more menacing-looking than the “Temple Mysteries.” But those Gods and Goddesses in mythology did have a bit of a temper.

 

 

Isis Temple in Grand Canyon is moody with lightning-like flashes covering the land.

Connected.

Originality in photography art.

Standing at Lipan Point, South Rim of the Grand Canyon at sunset, the glow warms up the rock walls. As I worked with some digital techniques, I saw the plateaus interlaced with synapses as though messages were being carried throughout the canyon in a massive network. The softness reminds me of moss, quite a different environment from the reality of the desert. 

 

Lipan Point in Grand Canyon looks interconnected with lines of light weaving through the canyon.

Carved.

Which river carved the Grand Canyon? 

The Colorado River revealed all this geological magic, as small a stream as it appears from high above. Again, this is Lipan Point. This digital artwork keeps the integrity of the desert, but the graphic lines make you feel like a giant used a chisel and massive muscles to sculpt the chasms. 

View of Grand Canyon from Lipan Point in a graphic

Calling a Comet.

Unusual landscape art.

Wotan’s Throne viewed from Cape Royal on the North Rim looks like a sculpture of low voltage, color-coated cables used to wire telephone lines in buildings. Perhaps it takes that much cable to call in a comet. 

 
 
Wotan's Throne fantasy landscape in Grand Canyon with a comet and expressionistic colors.

Laser Trip Wire Circuit.

Remember Tom Cruise in Mission Impossible dangling from a cable to hack a CIA computer, maneuvering through a field of lasers? Well, give him a helicopter and ask him to navigate Wotan’s Throne. This digital landscape photo will self-destruct in ten seconds.  Good luck with the mission!

 
 
Alien world look of Wotan's Throne in Grand Canyon with colorful laser trip wires all over the canyon walls.

Grand Weaver.

Spider web art.

Now, this is a fantasy landscape! 

Thank goodness, right? Or none of you are going to visit the Grand Canyon anytime soon. I did take a photo of a spider somewhere near Eloy, Arizona, in a cotton field. I don’t know why, and I didn’t think I’d ever do anything with that spider photo. As I worked with this view from the south rim seen from Hermit’s Rest Transfer Station, I thought this looked like a giant web draped over the canyon. A web deserves a spider, so he got his big debut.

 
 
A giant spider appears to have spun a web over much of the Grand Canyon in surrealistic digital art.

Fiberglass Canyon.

Fantasy landscape art.

Same scene, but it looks like a different day, right? I went way bolder on this version, and this one reminds me of flipping over something molded out of fiberglass. Thin glass filaments are woven into a strong material to create a canyon scene. Add a dash of sparkle and glow, and you’ve got yourself one grand swimming pool. Just fill with water.

 
 
Fractal-like design covers the Grand Canyon's walls in a bold graphic representation.

2 Comments

  1. Jill Reese

    Simply AMAZING!

    Reply
    • Ann Newman

      Thank you so much, Jill. There’s such fun in creating something that is unique, yet somewhat recognizable.

      Reply

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